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  • surviving tarmac delays

    Surviving the dreaded tarmac delay - Yahoo! News

  • #2
    Ya' know, I have never been put in that position of being held hostage on an aircraft, yet! However, should it come to an endless hour upon hour delay wherein people are getting sick, desperate, hungary, and of need of facilities, I wouldn't hesitate to pull the handle on the emergency window release and exit the aircraft that way. The aircraft won't be pressurized due to the squat switch keeping the cabin dump valves open. I and others may be arrested on the tarmac but the airline surely is not going to hold passengers against their will as if in a prison! I think people in that position should take a more aggressive approach to getting off the aircraft. I would consider using the same technique should I observe a heavy concentration of ice build up on the wing after a long wait.

    Surely, there has to be some expert constitutional lawyer out there willing to defend passengers caught in these situations. Congress needs to act and define a passenger bill of rights but I think those rights already exist. Whatever is enacted I think the current limit under consideration of three hours on the ground is way to long. It should be more like an hour and a half on the ground in anyone place.

    It has been my experience that many airline delays are self inflicted. Airlines schedule their flights for popular demand regardless of what reality dictates for the departing airport. Many times the proposals for aircraft departing DFW, DEN or other major airports have twenty five or more aircraft departing the same minute, which is impossible under the rules. More over, the same airline will have a multitude of flights with the same proposed departure time which is physically impossible. Screw the airlines, I say, since that is what they are doing to you and I, the travelling public.

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    • #3
      Hobo, thats also a time when the Captain needs to be the Captain, and do what he has to do to get those people off that airplane, even if one has to declare a medical emergency.
      Only 511 ft lbs of Tq and only 1100 degrees EGT, damn, I need more fuel...

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      • #4
        Originally posted by jetboater View Post
        Hobo, thats also a time when the Captain needs to be the Captain, and do what he has to do to get those people off that airplane, even if one has to declare a medical emergency.
        I agree with you that the Captain of the aircraft should take the necessary action to relieve his passengers of the prison in which the aircraft has become. But, do these airlines hold the flight crews with their job as an incentive to not do anything? I am sure that the crews are restrained by their own companies and by the TSA.

        I think there are very real obstacles to the Captain being the Captain. TSA and these other "security" issues as well as company policies come to mind as a real threat to the crew of the aircraft. As a passenger, on one of these prisons, the pulling of the emergency exit would be grounds for several federal laws to be brought against me. But, at that point the Captain would have lost control of the ship as people exited the aircraft, a mutiny of sorts.

        I don't know of any successful lawsuits being brought against airlines by people that have previously been victims of these six hour or longer delayed aircraft. If there have been any I guess I haven't read about them. If we don't have a case in court then I would also guess that maritime laws take precedence wherein once on board your part of a very captive audience. Still, given the circumstance of sickness, no food, no water, the emergency exit would be an option for me, to Hell with the Captain!

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        • #5
          I am not aware of any successfull lawsuits for being held, and I agree, you would most certainly find your self in legal trouble for pulling that handle.

          I asked a friend, who is a Q400 Cap, he said in the old days the Captain would have done what was necessary, but times have changed, but one thing that will get that door open, is a passenger that has asked for, and declared a medical emergency, then the crew is duty bound to call it in as such, and request EMS. But, there had better be a reason, or...
          Only 511 ft lbs of Tq and only 1100 degrees EGT, damn, I need more fuel...

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