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  • #16
    Probably 5 times is about the max for me, maybe 6. Depends on when the case necks decide to split. Once they do, I usually trash that batch.

    I'm running them through AR's though, a bolt gun will be easier on brass so you could probably get a few more reloading cycles that way. You can also anneal the necks again to stress relieve the work hardening but on 5.56mm brass I don't see the cost benefit of it.

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    • #17
      Originally posted by Penguin View Post
      Probably 5 times is about the max for me, maybe 6. Depends on when the case necks decide to split. Once they do, I usually trash that batch.

      I'm running them through AR's though, a bolt gun will be easier on brass so you could probably get a few more reloading cycles that way. You can also anneal the necks again to stress relieve the work hardening but on 5.56mm brass I don't see the cost benefit of it.
      I'm running mine through a Colt M4. It seems like everywhere I go, I score a bag or 2 of brass. Now I found a dude in the Chair Force that just throws that shit away! I'm getting all of it now! I've got so much fucking brass I'll be loading for 2 years. Can never have enough though. Just scored a bag of 600 pulled bullets too. This shit is everywhere!
      "I HAVE MADE MY FINAL POST ON THIS FORUM. MY THANKS TO A FEW WHO HAVE BEEN VERY HELPFULL, HOWEVER I AM NOT GOING TO WASTE MY VALUABLE REST, READING AND RESPONDING TO "US vs THEM" VITRIOLIC PEOPLE."

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      • #18
        Yeah stock up while you can if you have a good source. Especially on powder and primers.

        I'll also note that if you are feeding an M4 or other semi-autos you should probably invest in a case gauge to actually measure your brass. As you know by now, you can't adjust your resizing die by feel with a semi-auto since you can't feel the effort it takes to close the bolt on a chambered round. Despite their best efforts die manufacturers do have some variances, mostly due to shell holders, and you can end up pushing the datum line on the case shoulder back too far even after setting up a die to their instructions. Pushing your shoulder back even a few .001's too far will result in excessive head space, and eventually in a ruptured/separated case head if you keep reloading the brass. What happens is that upon firing the brass expands to make a sealed chamber, which is normal, but it also flows forward due to the excess head space. This ends up stretching the brass back at the case head, making it thinner and thinner each time. Until the case head eventually separates from the case body, rendering your M4 carbine into an inert stick.

        Sometimes excessive head space will manifest itself as an easily visible pressure sign on your fired case. For example primers backing out, or brass flowing into the ejector or extractor cut outs. I've experienced this, and found out my resizing die was bumping the shoulder back too much. Bought a case gauge, set the die according to what the brass told me in the gauge and problem solved.

        On the plus side case gauges are cheap, and easy to use if you don't have one already. Also broken shell extractors aren't very costly either come to think of it.

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