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  • Bushmaster 223

    Just ordered a Bushmaster 223, Model BCWA2s-20 Always wanted an M16 style since I used them in the Army and found them stunningly accurate. This particular model is as near to the M16A1 that I used that I can find, but has the A2 improvements on it. And of course not fully automatic.
    Last edited by jonnyseeandoh; 10-06-2009, 01:15 PM.
    sigpic ΜΟΛΩΝ ΛΑΒΕ "Come and get them" Leonidas I to Xerxes, at Battle of Thermopylae

  • #2
    Have fun, be safe. If it has a 1/7 twist barrel it will really like 62-75 grain bullets.

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    • #3
      I think it does....thanks for the tip, was wondering what sort of appetite it had. 27 years is a long time.
      sigpic ΜΟΛΩΝ ΛΑΒΕ "Come and get them" Leonidas I to Xerxes, at Battle of Thermopylae

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      • #4
        Originally posted by jonnyseeandoh View Post
        I think it does....thanks for the tip, was wondering what sort of appetite it had. 27 years is a long time.
        It may also run 55 grain bullets well too, but top accuracy with a 1/7 will usually be about a 69 to 77 grain bullet.

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        • #5
          I have a Bushmaster M4 Style Carbine. It has a 1:9 twist and is chambered for 5.56mm.

          Mine really enjoys Hornady 55 gr. FMJ's or Hornady's Ballistic tipped bullets.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Widget View Post
            I have a Bushmaster M4 Style Carbine. It has a 1:9 twist and is chambered for 5.56mm.

            Mine really enjoys Hornady 55 gr. FMJ's or Hornady's Ballistic tipped bullets.
            Ya, I think most Bushy's are 1 in 9 twists. They are chambered for 5.56. That is a plus in my book since you will be able to shoot 223 and the higher pressure 5.56 rounds. The 1 in 9 twist will shoot 55 grain to 62 grain very nicely.

            I have a Bushy heavy barrel M4 style carbine.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Zeb View Post
              Ya, I think most Bushy's are 1 in 9 twists. They are chambered for 5.56. That is a plus in my book since you will be able to shoot 223 and the higher pressure 5.56 rounds. The 1 in 9 twist will shoot 55 grain to 62 grain very nicely.

              I have a Bushy heavy barrel M4 style carbine.
              Reviewed the spec sheet, mine will also be a 1 in 9 and has a Picatinny rail although I shoot open sights so won't use the rail. Am fond of Hornady cartridges, and they have a couple 60gr that I will try. I must have fired a million military 5.56 rounds in my day, and looking forward to comparing that and 223.
              sigpic ΜΟΛΩΝ ΛΑΒΕ "Come and get them" Leonidas I to Xerxes, at Battle of Thermopylae

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              • #8
                Originally posted by jonnyseeandoh View Post
                Reviewed the spec sheet, mine will also be a 1 in 9 and has a Picatinny rail although I shoot open sights so won't use the rail. Am fond of Hornady cartridges, and they have a couple 60gr that I will try. I must have fired a million military 5.56 rounds in my day, and looking forward to comparing that and 223.
                There is not a huge amount of difference between 5.56mm NATO and .223 in actual performance. The 5.56mm is loaded to slightly higher pressures, and the brass is the tiniest bit longer. The slightly longer brass and higher pressure can cause problems in .223 chambers, especially tight .223 match chambers so 5.56mm is a no no in a .223 chamber. The 5.56mm chamber on the other hand will safely handle both rounds no problem, but will not have the best accuracy with .223 ammo. There is another type of chamber that splits the difference called the .223 Wylde chamber that can safely run good quality 5.56mm but doesn't sacrifice much if any .223 accuracy.

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                • #9
                  even with a 1-9 twist, I bet Blacks Hills 75Gr HPBT hornady bullets will drive nails in that weapon....
                  Only 511 ft lbs of Tq and only 1100 degrees EGT, damn, I need more fuel...

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by jetboater View Post
                    even with a 1-9 twist, I bet Blacks Hills 75Gr HPBT hornady bullets will drive nails in that weapon....
                    I wouldn't bet against it although a 1:9 is approaching the limits on being able to stabilize a 75-77gr bullet. On the plus side if it will then it should be really really really accurate as a bullet is most accurate when stabilized to the minimum requirement for rotational velocity.

                    A 1:8 twist barrel would be even better; enough twist for positive stabilization of heavier bullets in the 69-77gr class, and not a stupid amount for lighter bullets. If you want to get down to it a 1:7 is really kind of overkill for anything but tracer ammo, and how many of us shoot a lot of (or any) tracer ammo? I sure as hell don't anymore.
                    Last edited by Penguin; 10-07-2009, 02:36 AM.

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                    • #11
                      I shoot the M193 (55 gr) military surplus all the time out of my Bushmaster. I keep M855 / SS109 (62 gr) military surplus on hand as well, but don't use it to plink. Those are strictly for the zombies.

                      Military uses the M193 mainly on the ranges and the M855 for the combat.

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                      • #12
                        Well I got my rifle and shot some ammo to zero it. I should be more specific on what I got. I gave the Davidson's catalog number previously, but of course the model number is XM15A2-EWS. This one does not have a Picatinny rail, and for me that is good, I prefer the fixed carry handle I was previously acquainted with. In shooting I found some of the quirks I was familiar with on the Vietnam vintage M16A1 I was issued in the Army are present even now. The piece is a bit picky how you position the top round in the magazine, and will fail to pick it up if not perfectly placed the first time you release the bolt. As usual you may not know this until you pull the trigger, and nothing happens. You proceed initially as if you had a squib, then when satisfied all is OK, withdraw the bolt to find nothing there. Oh well, it shoots straight as an arrow as I hoped it would. I got both .223 and 5.56 55 gr. Zeroed with the 5.56, and ordered a ammo can full of PMC 5.56 55gr, which should appear soon on my steps.
                        sigpic ΜΟΛΩΝ ΛΑΒΕ "Come and get them" Leonidas I to Xerxes, at Battle of Thermopylae

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by jonnyseeandoh View Post
                          Well I got my rifle and shot some ammo to zero it. I should be more specific on what I got. I gave the Davidson's catalog number previously, but of course the model number is XM15A2-EWS. This one does not have a Picatinny rail, and for me that is good, I prefer the fixed carry handle I was previously acquainted with. In shooting I found some of the quirks I was familiar with on the Vietnam vintage M16A1 I was issued in the Army are present even now. The piece is a bit picky how you position the top round in the magazine, and will fail to pick it up if not perfectly placed the first time you release the bolt. As usual you may not know this until you pull the trigger, and nothing happens. You proceed initially as if you had a squib, then when satisfied all is OK, withdraw the bolt to find nothing there. Oh well, it shoots straight as an arrow as I hoped it would. I got both .223 and 5.56 55 gr. Zeroed with the 5.56, and ordered a ammo can full of PMC 5.56 55gr, which should appear soon on my steps.
                          Just about any magazine fed weapon is sensitive to proper round placement in the magazine. After loading the magazine tap the back of the magazine firmly against your free hand in the palm. That will almost always seat all the rounds back against the rear of the magazine body where they belong.

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                          • #14
                            I bet a bit of wear will smooth things out too.
                            sigpic ΜΟΛΩΝ ΛΑΒΕ "Come and get them" Leonidas I to Xerxes, at Battle of Thermopylae

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by jonnyseeandoh View Post
                              I bet a bit of wear will smooth things out too.
                              True, you won't know if you have a really reliable rifle until you've put about 500 rounds down it. Give it a chance to loosen up a bit and have all the moving parts break in their contact surfaces.

                              Remember AR's hate to run dry, so be generous with the lube! Make sure the bold and bolt carrier are generously lubricated and your AR will run like a top.

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